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The Unfinished Nation A Concise History of the American People 8Th Edition By Alan Brinkley – Test Bank

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The Unfinished Nation A Concise History of the American People 8Th Edition By Alan Brinkley – Test Bank

Chapter 14 The Civil War Key

  1. (p. 322) The first state to secede from the Union, in 1860, was
  1. Virginia.
  1. Mississippi.
  1. Alabama.
  1. Georgia.
  1. South Carolina.

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Topic: The Secession Crisis

  1. (p. 322) In 1860 and 1861, President James Buchanan asserted
  1. that he would not resupply Fort Sumter, as it was a lost cause.
  1. that states had the constitutional right to secede from the United States.
  1. that the federal government had no authority to stop a state from seceding from the Union.
  1. All these answers are correct.
  1. that he would surrender Fort Sumter if South Carolina would rejoin the Union.

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Topic: The Secession Crisis

  1. (p. 322) The Confederate States of America was formed
  1. after eleven Southern states had seceded.
  1. in a meeting hall in Washington, D.C.
  1. after Texas seceded from the Union.
  1. despite the passage of the Crittenden Compromise.
  1. after Fort Sumter fell to forces from seceding states.

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Topic: The Secession Crisis

  1. (p. 322-323) The Crittenden Compromise found its greatest support in
  1. abolitionists.
  1. Republican senators.
  1. the western territories.
  1. Southern senators.
  1. President Abraham Lincoln.

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Topic: The Secession Crisis

  1. (p. 323) On April 14, 1861, Fort Sumter surrendered after
  1. the Union commanding officer, Robert Anderson, was killed.
  1. President Lincoln chose to not resupply the fort.
  1. the fort’s commander decided to join the Confederacy.
  1. Confederate forces bombarded it for two days.
  1. Southern soldiers occupied the fort.

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Topic: The Secession Crisis

  1. (p. 323) All of the following slave states remained in the Union EXCEPT
  1. Maryland.
  1. Delaware.
  1. Kentucky.
  1. Missouri.
  1. Arkansas.

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Topic: The Secession Crisis

  1. (p. 323) At the start of the Civil War, the
  1. South had more combat-age males.
  1. South had more and better railroads.
  1. North was unified by a commitment to end slavery.
  1. South had a massive reserve of cash.
  1. North had more advanced industrial and transportation systems.

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Topic: The Secession Crisis

  1. (p. 326) The 1862 Morrill Act was designed to help
  1. banks.
  1. free blacks.
  1. industry.
  1. railroads.
  1. education.

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Topic: The Mobilization of the North

  1. (p. 327) Which of the following federally-chartered corporations did the Union create to build the transcontinental railroad?
  1. Central Pacific
  1. Union Pacific
  1. Western Pacific and Central Pacific
  1. Western Pacific
  1. Union Pacific and Central Pacific

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Topic: The Mobilization of the North

  1. (p. 337) Taxes enacted by the United States Congress to help finance the Civil War
  1. kept the sale of public bonds low.
  1. were vetoed by President Lincoln.
  1. allowed the federal government to avoid incurring significant debt.
  1. were strongly supported by most citizens in the Union.
  1. included a new income tax.

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Topic: The Mobilization of the North

  1. (p. 327) During the Civil War, “greenbacks” issued by the federal government
  1. were backed by gold.
  1. were backed by gold and silver.
  1. fluctuated in value depending on the fortunes of the Northern armies.
  1. steadily gained in value as the war progressed.
  1. were backed by silver.

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Topic: The Mobilization of the North

  1. (p. 327) At the start of the Civil War, the armed forces of the United States
  1. did not include a navy.
  1. had almost entirely defected to the Confederate side.
  1. consisted of roughly 400,000 troops.
  1. saw many of its soldiers stationed in the West.
  1. was largely made up of military draftees.

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Topic: The Mobilization of the North

  1. (p. 327) In 1861, President Abraham Lincoln realized that volunteer state militias
  1. could not be counted on to serve longer than three months.
  1. would operate as a drag on the more efficient and experienced United States army.
  1. could not wage an effective military campaign.
  1. would have to do the bulk of fighting for the Union.
  1. would provide all the military manpower the Union would require.

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Topic: The Mobilization of the North

  1. (p. 327-328) The Union’s national draft law
  1. resulted in murderous attacks in New York City against free blacks.
  1. proved to be unnecessary in the war effort.
  1. saw little in the way of opposition from the public.
  1. severely discouraged voluntary enlistment.
  1. allowed no provisions for escaping service.

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Topic: The Mobilization of the North

  1. (p. 328) In his capacity as commander in chief, President Abraham Lincoln
  1. waited for Congress to declare war before dispatching troops to the South.
  1. argued it was essential that the laws of the Constitution be upheld during the war.
  1. quickly called on Congress to enact a naval blockade of the South.
  1. moved cautiously in asserting his war powers.
  1. increased the size of the army without the approval of Congress.

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Topic: The Mobilization of the North

  1. (p. 327) Disloyal northerners, such as the “Copperheads.” were
  1. intent on using the Civil War to rapidly end slavery.
  1. Northerners who secretly spied for the Confederacy.
  1. largely members of the Republican Party.
  1. strong Lincoln supporters who often suppressed dissent violently.
  1. sometimes arrested on the order of President Lincoln.

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Topic: The Mobilization of the North

  1. (p. 328-329) In the election of 1864, President Abraham Lincoln
  1. faced a Democratic opponent who was a former Union general.
  1. was greatly aided by Robert E. Lee’s surrender just before Election Day.
  1. won by a narrow margin in the electoral vote.
  1. proposed a truce in the Civil War.
  1. emphasized the success of the Republican Party in fighting the Civil War.

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Topic: The Mobilization of the North

  1. (p. 329) All of the following were “Radical Republicans” EXCEPT
  1. Charles Sumner.
  1. Benjamin Wade.
  1. Thaddeus Stevens.
  1. None of these answers is correct.
  1. Abraham Lincoln.

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Topic: The Mobilization of the North

  1. (p. 329) The Confiscation Act of 1861
  1. gave Union troops the authority to seize Confederate property.
  1. abolished slavery in the District of Columbia and the western territories.
  1. saw the Confederate government claim the right to seize free blacks in the South.
  1. declared that slaves used by Confederate states in the war effort were free.
  1. empowered banks in the Union to freeze the financial assets of all slaveholders.

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Topic: The Mobilization of the North

  1. (p. 329) In the Emancipation Proclamation, President Abraham Lincoln declared freedom for slaves
  1. in the slave states that had remained loyal to the Union.
  1. that joined the Union military.
  1. throughout all states that existed as part of the United States prior to the Civil War.
  1. in the parts of the Confederacy still in rebellion.
  1. in the parts of the Confederacy already under Union control.

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Topic: The Mobilization of the North

  1. (p. 330-331) African American soldiers in the Union
  1. were allowed only to dig trenches and transport water.
  1. experienced a higher mortality rate than white soldiers.
  1. died in combat in larger numbers than white soldiers.
  1. constituted a large segment of the initial volunteers who joined the war effort.
  1. were not paid for their military service.

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Topic: The Mobilization of the North

  1. (p. 331) The United States Sanitary Commission
  1. defied the traditional stereotype of women.
  1. banned women from working in frontline field hospitals.
  1. was welcomed by male doctors.
  1. helped turn nursing into a female-dominated profession.
  1. was organized by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony.

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Topic: The Mobilization of the North

  1. (p. 331) Politically, the Confederate constitution
  1. gave the president and vice president four-year terms.
  1. allowed states the right to abolish slavery.
  1. did not allow anti-secessionists to serve in the Confederate government.
  1. was almost identical in many respects to the Constitution of the United States.
  1. gave states the right to secede.

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Topic: The Mobilization of the South

  1. (p. 331-332) Prior to becoming president of the Confederacy, Jefferson Davis had
  1. been vice president of the United States.
  1. been regarded as a moderate on secession.
  1. called for the imprisonment of abolitionists.
  1. begged South Carolina not to leave the Union.
  1. called for a gradual phase-out of slavery.

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Topic: The Mobilization of the South

  1. (p. 335) Which of the following is true of Jefferson Davis’s leadership?
  1. Davis was helpless to make command decisions without the presence of his top generals.
  1. Davis refused to appoint a cabinet to help him manage affairs of state.
  1. Davis demonstrated few administrative abilities.
  1. Davis spent most of his time dealing with party politics.
  1. Davis spent more time paying strict adherence to legal and constitutional requirements than on providing genuine national leadership.

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Topic: The Mobilization of the South

  1. (p. 332) In the Confederacy during the Civil War,
  1. the national government was almost completely impotent in its dealings with the states.
  1. Southern politicians were strongly united in supporting secession and the war.
  1. formal political parties quickly developed.
  1. President Jefferson Davis developed a reputation for reckless political action.
  1. many Southerners resisted efforts by the Davis government to exert its authority.

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Topic: The Mobilization of the South

  1. (p. 332) The Confederacy financed its war effort primarily through
  1. printing money.
  1. seizure of Northern assets.
  1. selling bonds.
  1. foreign loans.
  1. an income tax.

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Topic: The Mobilization of the South

  1. (p. 332) Between 1861 and 1864, the cost of goods in the Confederacy rose by
  1. 200 percent.
  1. 3,000 percent.
  1. 1,000 percent.
  1. 600 percent.
  1. 9,000 percent.

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Topic: The Mobilization of the South

  1. (p. 332) In the Confederacy, a military draft
  1. compelled slaves to serve as soldiers.
  1. was not considered necessary until the last months of the Civil War.
  1. aroused opposition from poorer whites for its expensive substitute policy.
  1. never allowed for the hiring of substitutes.
  1. forced all white males between the ages of 18 and 25 to serve for three years.

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Topic: The Mobilization of the South

  1. (p. 333) The wartime South saw
  1. a significant decline in the production of goods.
  1. almost no black-market commerce.
  1. an increase in the sale of cotton overseas.
  1. numerous bloody slave revolts.
  1. women forced out of the public sphere.

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Topic: The Mobilization of the South

  1. (p. 333) In the South in 1865, as a result of the Civil War,
  1. few women could find employment.
  1. the traditional roles of women were reinforced and maintained.
  1. large numbers of widowed Southern women married Union soldiers.
  1. there were more women than men in some states.
  1. women were granted the right to vote for their wartime service.

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Topic: The Mobilization of the South

  1. (p. 333) The most important Union military commander was
  1. Ulysses S. Grant.
  1. George Meade.
  1. William Tecumseh Sherman.
  1. Robert E. Lee.
  1. George McClellan.

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Topic: Strategy and Diplomacy

  1. (p. 333) President Abraham Lincoln believed the main objective of the Union armies was to
  1. destroy the Confederate armies’ ability to fight.
  1. occupy Confederate territory.
  1. control Confederate ports.
  1. capture Richmond.
  1. free Southern slaves.

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Topic: Strategy and Diplomacy

  1. (p. 335) General Ulysses S. Grant
  1. thought the main Union effort should target enemy armies and resources.
  1. followed Winfield Scott as Lincoln’s military chief of staff.
  1. believed the key to victory was to capture the Confederate capital.
  1. did not agree with Abraham Lincoln’s general strategic objectives.
  1. was ultimately succeeded by Henry W. Halleck as chief of staff of the army.

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Topic: Strategy and Diplomacy

  1. (p. 328, 335, 341) Which of the following statements about George B. McClellan is FALSE?
  1. He ran against Abraham Lincoln in the election of 1864.
  1. He was found to have, in Lincoln’s opinion, a wholly inadequate grasp of strategy, acting too slow for Lincoln’s tastes.
  1. He was eventually replaced by General Henry W. Halleck.
  1. He originally served as commander of the Army of Northern Virginia.
  1. He served briefly as chief of staff but returned to the field in March 1862.

Topic: Strategy and Diplomacy

  1. (p. 335) The Union’s Committee on the Conduct of the War
  1. criticized Union generals for having too many combat deaths on both sides.
  1. limited the financial expenditures by the military.
  1. often greatly interfered with the conduct of the war.
  1. was consistently opposed by Radical Republicans such as Benjamin Wade.
  1. was organized by President Abraham Lincoln.

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Topic: Strategy and Diplomacy

  1. (p. 335) As president, Jefferson Davis
  1. made clear to General Lee that he wanted to make all the basic war decisions.
  1. relied heavily on the advice of Braxton Bragg.
  1. deferred all major military strategy to Robert E. Lee.
  1. created an effective central command system.
  1. had virtually no knowledge at all of military tactics and strategy.

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Topic: Strategy and Diplomacy

  1. (p. 335) In the Civil War, at lower levels of military command,
  1. amateur officers played important roles in both the Union and Confederate armies; and the professional officers on both sides were mostly Ivy League graduates.
  1. Northern and Southern commanders had markedly different backgrounds.
  1. amateur officers played important roles in both the Union and Confederate armies.
  1. None of these answers is correct.
  1. professional officers on both sides were mostly Ivy League graduates.

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Topic: Strategy and Diplomacy

  1. (p. 336-337) In naval warfare during the Civil War,
  1. both the Union and Confederate militaries developed ironclads.
  1. the Confederacy managed to build a navy equal to that of the Union.
  1. the Union blockade of the South was largely ineffective.
  1. the Confederacy managed to seize key Union ports such as Baltimore.
  1. the Confederacy devastated Union fleets with ironclad warships.

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Topic: Strategy and Diplomacy

  1. (p. 337) As a supporter of land operations, the Union naval presence was particularly important on the
  1. southern gulf.
  1. Great Lakes.
  1. Outer Banks.
  1. western rivers.
  1. Chesapeake.

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Topic: Strategy and Diplomacy

  1. (p. 337) In the course of the Civil War,
  1. English textile workers thrown out of jobs came to resent and oppose the Union.
  1. the English government consistently supported the Confederacy.
  1. the French government formally recognized the Confederacy.
  1. the ruling classes of England and France strongly opposed the Confederacy.
  1. popular support for the Union was strong in England.

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Topic: Strategy and Diplomacy

  1. (p. 337-338) In 1861, the so-called Trent affair
  1. created an international diplomatic crisis for Abraham Lincoln.
  1. was eventually resolved with an indirect apology by England.
  1. saw the capture of Union diplomats by the Confederate government.
  1. resulted in France recalling its ambassador from the United States.
  1. led England to form closer political ties with the Lincoln administration.

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Topic: Strategy and Diplomacy

  1. (p. 338) In the Civil War, the number of deaths for every 100,000 of the population was
  1. 500.
  1. 1,000.
  1. 4,000.
  1. 5,000.
  1. 2,000.

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Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. (p. 338) During the Civil War, as a result of new technology in weapons,
  1. infantry troops began to fight standing in line formations.
  1. soldiers were forced to carry rudimentary gas masks.
  1. the Gatling gun became the primary combat weapon.
  1. organized infantry did not fight in formation.
  1. battlefields became more organized.

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Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. (p. 338) Which of the following technologies was used, but did not play a major part in, the Civil War?
  1. railroads
  1. submarines
  1. the telegraph
  1. cannons
  1. repeating rifles

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Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. (p. 338-339) During the Civil War, railroad transportation
  1. gave commanders much more flexibility in the geographic distribution of their armies.
  1. None of these answers is correct.
  1. encouraged smaller engagements with fewer troops.
  1. in some ways acted to limit the mobility of armies.
  1. both encouraged smaller engagements with fewer troops, and acted to limit the mobility of armies.

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Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. (p. 339) The U.S. Military Telegraph Corps was headed by Thomas Scott and what future tycoon?
  1. Andrew Carnegie
  1. Cornelius Vanderbilt
  1. John D. Rockefeller
  1. Jay Gould
  1. J. Pierpont Morgan

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Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. (p. 339) In 1861, the First Battle of Manassas, or Bull Run,
  1. ended in a stalemate.
  1. saw a much larger Union force oppose Confederate troops.
  1. was a victory for the Confederates.
  1. proved a severe blow to Confederate morale.
  1. was witnessed by President Lincoln.

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Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. (p. 339) The state admitted to the Union during the Civil War was
  1. Wisconsin.
  1. Minnesota.
  1. Nevada.
  1. West Virginia.
  1. Iowa.

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Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. (p. 340) A major federal victory occurred in April 1862 when Union troops captured the city of
  1. New Orleans.
  1. Charleston.
  1. Vicksburg.
  1. Chattanooga.
  1. Mobile.

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Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. (p. 341) By the end of 1862, Union forces
  1. All these answers are correct.
  1. had driven Confederate forces out of Kentucky.
  1. had closed the mouth of the Mississippi to Confederate trade.
  1. had made considerable progress in the West.
  1. were having little success in the East.

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Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. (p. 339-341) The Peninsular campaign in 1862
  1. saw General George McClellan plan an ambitious assault on Charleston, South Carolina.
  1. was an example of General McClellan’s conservative approach to battle.
  1. ultimately ended in a major Union victory and signaled a turning point in the war.
  1. All these answers are correct.
  1. saw the first Confederate siege of Washington, D.C.

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Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. (p. 343) The Battle of Antietam in 1862
  1. both saw Robert E. Lee field an army twice the size of the Union forces, and led President Abraham Lincoln to remove George McClellan from command.
  1. saw Robert E. Lee field an army twice the size of the Union forces.
  1. All these answers are correct.
  1. led President Abraham Lincoln to remove George McClellan from command.
  1. was a significant Confederate victory.

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Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. (p. 344-345) The Battle of Vicksburg in 1863
  1. was decided by a massive assault by Union troops.
  1. allowed the North to split the Confederacy in two.
  1. put George McClellan back in good standing with President Lincoln.
  1. briefly revived the military hopes of the Confederacy.
  1. saw a quick Union victory.

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Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. (p. 345) As the Battle of Vicksburg was ending, another major battle was taking place in
  1. Shiloh.
  1. Gettysburg.
  1. Chickamauga.
  1. Antietam.
  1. Atlanta.

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Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. (p. 346) The Battle of Gettysburg
  1. was a Union victory, thanks to Meade having found a copy of Lee’s orders.
  1. represented the last time Confederate forces seriously threatened Union territory.
  1. saw Union General George Meade lose nearly a third of his army.
  1. saw Union General George Meade clearly be more aggressive than Robert E. Lee.
  1. saw Robert E. Lee poised for victory after his attack on Cemetery Ridge.

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Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. (p. 346) In the Battle of Gettysburg, in order to reach dug-in Union forces, General George Pickett’s division had to cross
  1. open country.
  1. an abandoned town.
  1. thick woods.
  1. a broad river.
  1. a steep hill.

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Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. (p. 347-348) General Grant’s Union forces attacked General Lee’s Confederate forces in the month-long
  1. clash at Nashville.
  1. northern campaign.
  1. siege of Vicksburg.
  1. Battle of Chickamauga.
  1. Battle of Gettysburg.

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Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. (p. 349) In 1864, General William T. Sherman’s “March to the Sea”
  1. attempted to avoid the civilian population.
  1. resulted in mass starvation among Sherman’s troops.
  1. saw him face more resistance than Grant faced to his north.
  1. never reached the Atlantic Ocean.
  1. was designed in part to demoralize Southerners.

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Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. (p. 349) Robert E. Lee surrendered to Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House after
  1. President Jefferson Davis announced the Confederate government was defeated.
  1. President Lincoln met President Davis.
  1. President Jefferson Davis was captured by Union forces.
  1. President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated.
  1. Lee recognized the futility of continued fighting.

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Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. (p. 322) President Buchanan did not believe that a state had the legal right to secede from the Union.

TRUE

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Topic: The Secession Crisis

  1. (p. 322-323) The Crittenden Compromise was essentially acceptable to Lincoln and the Republicans.

FALSE

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Topic: The Secession Crisis

  1. (p. 323) No additional states seceded from the Union once the war had begun.

FALSE

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Topic: The Secession Crisis

  1. (p. 323) The material advantages of the South were obvious right from the start of the war.

FALSE

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Topic: The Secession Crisis

  1. (p. 327) The North financed the Civil War primarily by borrowing money.

TRUE

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Topic: The Mobilization of the North

  1. (p. 327) To build up the Union army, Lincoln originally relied much more on volunteers in state militias than he did on an increase in the regular army.

TRUE

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Topic: The Mobilization of the North

  1. (p. 328) Despite being a Democrat, Andrew Johnson was selected to run with Lincoln in 1864.

TRUE

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Topic: The Mobilization of the North

  1. (p. 329) The Emancipation Proclamation did not apply to all of the slave states.

TRUE

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Topic: The Mobilization of the North

  1. (p. 330) African American mortality rates in the war were higher than those of whites.

TRUE

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Topic: The Mobilization of the North

  1. (p. 331) Black fighting men captured by the Confederates were treated the same as white prisoners of war.

FALSE

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Topic: The Mobilization of the North

  1. (p. 331) The Civil War helped transform nursing into a female profession, but these nurses encountered considerable resistance from male doctors.

TRUE

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Topic: The Mobilization of the North

  1. (p. 331) The Confederate constitution was almost identical to the Constitution of the United States.

TRUE

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Topic: The Mobilization of the South

  1. (p. 331) The Confederate constitution explicitly acknowledged the sovereignty of individual states and the right of secession.

FALSE

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Topic: The Mobilization of the South

  1. (p. 333) Lincoln understood that the proper objective of his armies was the occupation of Confederate territory.

FALSE

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Topic: Strategy and Diplomacy

  1. (p. 335) As commander in chief, Lincoln was given a fairly free hand by Congress in conducting the war as he saw fit.

FALSE

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Topic: Strategy and Diplomacy

  1. (p. 337) In the early part of the Civil War, the sympathies of the ruling classes in France and England lay with the Confederacy.

TRUE

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Topic: Strategy and Diplomacy

  1. (p. 339) By the end of the Civil War, communication by telegraph was used by both the North and South.

TRUE

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Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. (p. 339) The First Battle of Bull Run dealt a severe blow to Union morale and dispelled the illusion that the war would be a short one.

TRUE

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Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. (p. 346) After the Battle of Gettysburg, the weakened Confederate armies were never again able to seriously threaten Northern territory.

TRUE

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Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. (p. 347) Ulysses S. Grant believed in using the North’s great advantage in troops and material resources to overwhelm the South.

TRUE

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Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. (p. 349) General Sherman’s “March to the Sea” faced bitter opposition through Georgia and South Carolina from Confederate forces.

FALSE

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Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. What advantages and disadvantages did each side have when the Civil War began?

Topic: The Mobilization of the North
Topic: The Mobilization of the South
Topic: The Secession Crisis

  1. How did Abraham Lincoln and Jefferson Davis compare as presidents and military commanders?

Topic: The Mobilization of the North
Topic: The Mobilization of the South
Topic: The Secession Crisis

  1. What problems did each side have as they mobilized to fight the Civil War?

Topic: The Mobilization of the North
Topic: The Mobilization of the South

  1. What methods did President Lincoln use to suppress popular opposition to the war in the North?

Topic: The Mobilization of the North

  1. Why was the South so confident of its “cotton diplomacy”? Why did it fail?

Topic: The Mobilization of the South

  1. In what ways did women participate in the Civil War, and how did the conflict change the status of women in both the North and the South?

Topic: The Mobilization of the North
Topic: The Mobilization of the South

  1. What did the Emancipation Proclamation do, and how did it alter the Civil War?

Topic: The Mobilization of the North

  1. Describe the debate in the North over the involvement of African Americans in the Civil War, and assess the significance of their participation in the war.

Topic: The Mobilization of the North

  1. How did new technology change the strategy of war?

Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. Why was the death toll in the Civil War so tremendous?

Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. Why might the Civil War be described as the first “modern war”?

Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. Why did 1863 prove to be such a pivotal year on the battlefield?

Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. Which battle—Vicksburg or Gettysburg—was more significant in determining the outcome of the Civil War?

Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. Given the material and manpower advantage of the North, what factors enabled the South to wage war as long as it did?

Topic: Campaigns and Battles
Topic: Strategy and Diplomacy

  1. Why did the North have to effectively destroy much of the South in order to the win the Civil War?

Topic: Campaigns and Battles

  1. Discuss the strengths and weaknesses of Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee as military commanders.

Topic: Campaigns and Battles
Topic: Strategy and Diplomacy

Chapter 14 The Civil War Summary

Category# of Questions

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation-80

Topic: Campaigns and Battles-31

Topic: Strategy and Diplomacy-16

Topic: The Mobilization of the North-29

Topic: The Mobilization of the South-16

Topic: The Secession Crisis-13

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