Page contents

Pathophysiology The Biologic Basis for Disease in Adults and Children,7th Edition by Kathryn L. – Test Bank

Instant delivery only

  • ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 0323244947
  • ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-0323244947

In Stock

Original price was: $73.00.Current price is: $28.00.

Add to Wishlist
Add to Wishlist
Compare
SKU:tb1002756

Pathophysiology The Biologic Basis for Disease in Adults and Children,7th Edition by Kathryn L. – Test Bank

Chapter 7: Innate Immunity: Inflammation

MULTIPLE CHOICE

1. Which action is a purpose of the inflammatory process?
a. To provide specific responses toward antigens
b. To lyse cell membranes of microorganisms
c. To prevent infection of the injured tissue
d. To create immunity against subsequent tissue injury

ANS: C
If the epithelial barrier is damaged, then a highly efficient local and systemic response (inflammation) is mobilized to limit the extent of damage, to protect against infection, and to initiate the repair of damaged tissue. The other options do not accurately identify a purpose of the inflammatory process.

PTS: 1 REF: Page 191

2. How do surfactant proteins A through D provide innate resistance?
a. Initiate the complement cascade. c. Secrete mucus.
b. Promote phagocytosis. d. Synthesize lysosomes.

ANS: B
The lung produces and secretes a family of glycoproteins, collectins, which includes surfactant proteins A through D and mannose-binding lectin. Collectin binding facilitates macrophages to recognize the microorganism, enhancing macrophage attachment, phagocytosis, and killing. The other options do not accurately identify how surfactant proteins provide innate resistance.

PTS: 1 REF: Page 194

3. Which secretion is a first line of defense against pathogen invasion that involves antibacterial and antifungal fatty acids, as well as lactic acid?
a. Optic tears c. Sweat gland perspiration
b. Oral saliva d. Sebaceous gland sebum

ANS: D
Sebaceous glands in the skin secrete sebum that is made up of antibacterial and antifungal fatty acids and lactic acid that provide the first-line barrier against pathogen invasion.

PTS: 1 REF: Pages 192-193

4. Which bacterium grows in the intestines after prolonged antibiotic therapy?
a. Lactobacillus c. Clostridium difficile
b. Candida albicans d. Helicobacter pylori

ANS: C
Prolonged antibiotic treatment can alter the normal intestinal flora, decreasing its protective activity and leading to the overgrowth of other microorganisms, such as the yeast C. albicans or the bacterium C. difficile. The other options do not accurately identify intestinal bacterium whose growth is a result of prolonged antibiotic therapy.

PTS: 1 REF: Page 194

5. What causes the edema that occurs during the inflammatory process?
a. Vasodilation of blood vessels c. Endothelial cell contraction
b. Increased capillary permeability d. Emigration of neutrophils

ANS: B
The increased flow and capillary permeability result in a leakage of plasma from the vessels, causing swelling (edema) in the surrounding tissue and is solely responsible for inflammation-induced edema.

PTS: 1 REF: Page 195

6. What process causes heat and redness to occur during the inflammatory process?
a. Vasodilation of blood vessels c. Decreased capillary permeability
b. Platelet aggregation d. Endothelial cell contraction

ANS: A
The increased blood flow as a result of vasodilation and increasing concentration of red cells at the site of inflammation cause locally increased warmth and redness. The other options do not accurately identify the process that results in inflammatory redness and heat.

PTS: 1 REF: Page 195

 

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Write a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Product has been added to your cart