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Information Systems 5th Edition By Baltzan – Test Bank

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Information Systems 5th Edition By Baltzan – Test Bank

M: Information Systems, 5e (Baltzan)

Chapter 7 Networks: Mobile Business

1) The network categories include LAN, WAN, and MAN.

2) The network providers include ISP, NSP, and RSP.

3) The network access technologies include DSL, cable modem, and broadband.

4) The network protocols include TCP/IP, FTP, and DHCP.

5) Network convergence includes VoIP, UC, and IPTV.

6) The network categories include ISP, NSP, and RSP.

7) The network providers include LAN, WAN, and MAN.

8) The network access technologies include VoIP, UC, and IPTV.

9) The network protocols include LAN, WAN, and MAN.

10) Network convergence includes TCP/IP and FTP.

11) A local area network (LAN) connects a group of computers in close proximity, such as in an office building, school, or home. LANs allow sharing of files, printers, games, and other resources.

12) A wide area network (WAN) spans a large geographic area such as a state, province, or country.

13) A wide area network (WAN) connects a group of computers in close proximity, such as in an office building, school, or home.

14) A metropolitan area network (MAN) spans a large geographic area such as a state, province, or country.

15) Attenuation represents the loss of a network signal strength measured in decibels (dB) and occurs because the transmissions gradually dissipate in strength over longer distances or because of radio interference or physical obstructions such as walls.

16) A repeater receives and repeats a signal to reduce its attenuation and extend its range.

17) A metropolitan area network (MAN) is a large computer network usually spanning a city. Most colleges, universities, and large companies that span a campus use an infrastructure supported by a MAN.

18) A local area network (LAN) is a large computer network usually spanning a city.

19) Network convergence is the integration of communication channels into a single service.

20) A domain name system (DNS) converts IP addresses into domains, or identifying labels that use a variety of recognizable naming conventions.

21) A local area network (LAN) connects a group of computers in close proximity, such as in an office building, school, or home. LANs allow sharing of files, printers, games, and other resources. A LAN also often connects to other LANs, and to wide area networks.

22) A wide area network (WAN) spans a large geographic area such as a state, province, or country. Perhaps the best example is the Internet.

23) Broadband over power line (BPL) technology makes possible high-speed Internet access over ordinary residential electrical lines and offers an alternative to DSL or high-speed cable modems.

24) A repeater represents the loss of a network signal strength measured in decibels and occurs because the transmissions gradually dissipate in strength over longer distances or radio interference or physical obstructions like walls also impact communication signals.

25) A repeater receives and repeats a signal extending its attenuation or range.

26) A metropolitan area network (MAN) is a large computer network usually spanning a city.

27) Attenuation is a single unit of binary data routed through a network.

28) Packets directly impact network performance and reliability by subdividing an electronic message into smaller more manageable packets.

29) Traceroute formats include a packet header, packet body containing the original message, and packet footer.

30) The packet header lists the destination (for example in IP packets the destination is the IP address) along with the length of the message data.

31) The packet footer represents the end of the packet or transmission end. The packet header and packet footer contain error-checking information to ensure the entire message is sent and received. The receiving device reassembles the individual packets into the original by stripping off the headers and footers and then piecing together the packets in the correct sequence.

32) Dynamic host configuration protocol is a utility application that monitors the network path of packet data sent to a remote computer.

33) Telecommuting (virtual workforce) allows users to work from remote locations such as home or hotel using high-speed Internet to access business applications and data.

34) IP address is a unique number that identifies where computers are located on the network.

35) IP address is a simple network protocol that allows the transfer of files between two computers on the Internet.

36) Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP) allows dynamic IP address allocation so users do not have to have a preconfigured IP address to use the network.

37) A proxy is software that prevents direct communication between a sending and receiving computer and is used to monitor packets for security reasons.

38) Voice over IP (VoIP) uses IP technology to transmit telephone calls.

39) Peer-to-peer (P2P) is a computer network that relies on the computing power and bandwidth of the participants in the network rather than a centralized server.

40) Internet Protocol TV (IPTV) distributes digital video content using IP across the Internet and private IP networks.

41) Peer-to-peer uses IP technology to transmit telephone calls.

42) Voice over IP is a computer network that relies on the computing power and bandwidth of the participants in the network rather than a centralized server.

43) A repeater distributes digital video content using IP across the Internet and private IP networks.

44) An intranet is a restricted network that relies on Internet technologies to provide an Internet-like environment within the company for information sharing, communications, collaboration, Web publishing, and the support of business processes.

45) An extranet is an extension of an intranet that is available only to authorized outsiders, such as customers, partners, and suppliers.

46) Companies can establish direct private network links among themselves or create private, secure Internet access, in effect a private tunnel within the Internet, called a virtual private network (VPN).

47) An extranet is a restricted network that relies on Internet technologies to provide an Internet-like environment within the company for information sharing, communications, collaboration, Web publishing, and the support of business processes.

48) An intranet is an extension of an intranet that is available only to authorized outsiders, such as customers, partners, and suppliers.

49) Companies can establish direct private network links among themselves or create private, secure Internet access, in effect a private tunnel within the Internet, called an extranet.

50) VPNs are often used to connect to a corporate server. VPN stands for a valued partner network.

51) The main challenges facing networks include security, social, ethical, and political issues.

52) Two methods for encrypting network traffic on the Web are secure sockets layer and secure hypertext transfer protocol.

53) Secure sockets layer (SSL) is a combination of HTTP and SSL to provide encryption and secure identification of an Internet server.

54) Some of the social challenges with networking occur with newsgroups or blogs where like-minded people can exchange messages. Problems can arise when sensitive social issues become the topic of discussion such as politics or religion.

55) Mobile and wireless networks are identical and the terms can be used synonymously.

56) The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) is an organization that researches and institutes electrical standards for communication and other technologies. Known officially as IEEE 802.11n (or wireless-N) is the newest standard for wireless networking. Compared with earlier standards like 802.11b, wireless-N offers faster speeds, more flexibility, and greater range.

57) A wireless LAN (WLAN) is a means by which portable devices can connect wirelessly to a local area network, using access points that send and receive data via radio waves.

58) Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WiMAX) is a communications technology aimed at providing high-speed wireless data over metropolitan area networks.

59) Mobile means the technology can travel with the user; for instance, users can download software, email messages, and web pages onto a laptop or other mobile device for portable reading or reference. Information collected while on the road can be synchronized with a PC or company server.

60) Wireless refers to any type of operation accomplished without the use of a hard-wired connection.

61) A personal area network (PAN) provides communication for devices owned by a single user that work over a short distance.

62) Bluetooth is a wireless PAN technology that transmits signals over short distances among cell phones, computers, and other devices.

63) A wireless LAN (WLAN) is a local area network that uses radio signals to transmit and receive data over distances of a few hundred feet.

64) An access point (AP) is the computer or network device that serves as an interface between devices and the network. Each computer initially connects to the access point and then to other computers on the network.

65) A wireless access point (WAP) enables devices to connect to a wireless network to communicate with each other.

66) An access point provides communication for devices owned by a single user that work over a short distance.

67) The digital divide is a wireless PAN technology that transmits signals over short distances among cell phones, computers, and other devices.

68) A wireless WAN (WWAN) is a local area network that uses radio signals to transmit and receive data over distances of a few hundred feet.

69) A voice over LTE is the computer or network device that serves as an interface between devices and the network. Each computer initially connects to the access point and then to other computers on the network.

70) A secure socket layer enables devices to connect to a wireless network to communicate with each other.

71) Wi-Fi infrastructure includes the inner workings of a Wi-Fi service or utility, including the signal transmitters, towers, or poles and additional equipment required to send out a Wi-Fi signal.

72) Hotspots are designated locations where Wi-Fi access points are publicly available.

73) A wireless MAN (WMAN) is a metropolitan area network that uses radio signals to transmit and receive data.

74) Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WiMAX) is a communications technology aimed at providing high-speed wireless data over metropolitan area networks.

75) A wireless WAN (WWAN) is a wide area network that uses radio signals to transmit and receive data.

76) Streaming is a method of sending audio and video files over the Internet in such a way that the user can view the file while it is being transferred.

77) Voice over LTE (VoLTE) allows mobile voice calls to be made over broadband networks, creating—under the right network conditions—clearer audio and fewer dropped calls.

78) A satellite is a space station that orbits the Earth, receiving and transmitting signals from Earth-based stations over a wide area.

79) Wired equivalent privacy (WEP) is an encryption algorithm designed to protect wireless transmission data.

80) Wi-Fi protected access (WPA) is a wireless security protocol to protect Wi-Fi networks.

81) War chalking is the practice of tagging pavement with codes displaying where Wi-Fi access is available. The codes for war chalking tell other users the kind of access available, the speed of the network, and if the network is secured.

82) War driving is deliberately searching for Wi-Fi signals while driving by in a vehicle.

83) IT consumerization is the blending of personal and business use of technology devices and applications.

84) Mobile device management (MDM) remotely controls smart phones and tablets, ensuring data security.

85) Mobile application management (MAM) administers and delivers applications to corporate and personal smart phones and tablets.

86) Mobile device management is a method of sending audio and video files over the Internet in such a way that the user can view the file while it is being transferred.

87) War driving allows mobile voice calls to be made over broadband networks, creating—under the right network conditions—clearer audio and fewer dropped calls.

88) A satellite is a space station that orbits the Sun, receiving and transmitting signals from Mars-based stations over a wide area.

89) Wi-Fi protected access (WAP) is an encryption algorithm designed to protect wireless transmission data.

90) Wired equivalent privacy (WEP) is a wireless security protocol to protect Wi-Fi networks.

91) War consumerization is the practice of tagging pavement with codes displaying where Wi-Fi access is available.

92) War chalking is deliberately searching for Wi-Fi signals while driving by in a vehicle.

93) Device customization is the blending of personal and business use of technology devices and applications.

94) Mobile application management (MAM) remotely controls smart phones and tablets, ensuring data security.

95) Mobile device management (MDM) administers and delivers applications to corporate and personal smart phones and tablets.

96) Radio-frequency identification (RFID) uses electronic tags and labels to identify objects wirelessly over short distances.

97) RFID innovations and technologies are being used in many industries including retail, hospitals, pharmaceuticals, and ranching.

98) A global positioning system (GPS) consists of hardware, software, and data that provide location information for display on a multidimensional map.

99) A geographic information system (GIS) stores, views, and analyzes geographic data, creating multidimensional charts or maps.

100) A global positioning system (GPS) is a satellite-based navigation system providing extremely accurate position, time, and speed information.

101) A great GIS example, Google Earth, combines satellite imagery, geographic data, and Google’s search capabilities to create a virtual globe that users can download to a computer or mobile device.

102) GPS utilizes location-based services (LBS), applications that use location information to provide a service, whereas a GIS does not use LBS applications.

103) Passive RFID tags do not have a power source

104) Passive RFID tags have their own transmitter and a power source (typically a battery).

105) Active RFID tags use a battery to run the microchip’s circuitry, but communicate by drawing power from the RFID reader.

106) Asset tracking occurs when a company places active or semi-passive RFID tags on expensive products or assets to gather data on the items location with little or no manual intervention.

107) RFID accelerometer is a device that measures the acceleration (the rate of change of velocity) of an item and is used to track truck speeds or taxi cab speeds.

108) Active RFID tags do not depend on a silicon microchip and use plastic or conductive polymers instead of silicon-based microchips allowing them to be washed or exposed to water without damaging the chip.

109) An RFID tag is an electronic identification device that is made up of a chip and antenna.

110) An RFID reader (RFID interrogator) is a transmitter/receiver that reads the contents of RFID tags in the area. A RFID system is comprised of one or more RFID tags, one or more RFID readers, two or more antennas.

111) Automatic vehicle location (AVL) uses GPS tracking to track vehicles.

112) Geographic information system (GIS) stores, views, and analyzes geographic data creating multidimensional charts or maps. For example, GIS are monitoring global warming by measuring the speed of glaciers melting in Canada, Greenland, and Antarctica.

113) Cartography is the science and art of making an illustrated map or chart. GIS allows users to interpret, analyze, and visualize data in different ways that reveal patterns and trends in the form of reports, charts, and maps.

114) Traceroute occurs when paper maps are laid edge-to-edge and items that run across maps do not match are reconfigured to match.

115) GIS map automation links business assets to a centralized system where they can be tracked and monitored over time.

116) Spatial data (geospatial data or geographic information) identifies the geographic location of features and boundaries on Earth, such as natural or constructed features, oceans, and more. Spatial data can be mapped and is stored as coordinates and topology. A GIS accesses, manipulates, and analyzes spatial data.

117) WiMAX is a coding process that takes a digital map feature and assigns it an attribute that serves as a unique ID (tract number, node number) or classification (soil type, zoning category). GIS professionals are certified in geocoding practices to ensure industry standards are met when classifying spatial data.

118) Longitude represents a north/south measurement of position.

119) Latitude represents an east/west measurement of position.

120) Geocache is a GPS technology adventure game that posts the longitude and latitude location for an item on the Internet for users to find. GPS users find the geocache and typically sign a guest book or take an item and leave an item for the next adventure players to find. Caches are often placed in locations that are interesting or challenging for people to discover.

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