Page contents

Bates’ Guide To Physical Examination and History Taking 13th Edition Bickley Test Bank

Instant delivery only

  • Chapters: 27
  • Format: PDF
  • ISBN-13: 978-1496398178
  • ISBN-10: 1496398173
  • Publisher: LWW
  • Authors: Lynn S. Bickley MD FACP, Peter G. Szilagyi, Richard M. Hoffman, Rainier P. Soriano

In Stock

Original price was: $80.00.Current price is: $22.00.

Add to Wishlist
Add to Wishlist
Compare
SKU:tb1001669

Bates’ Guide To Physical Examination and History Taking 13th Edition Bickley Test Bank

Table of Content

UNIT 1  Foundations of Health Assessment
CHAPTER 1         Approach to the Clinical Encounter
CHAPTER 2         Interviewing, Communication, and Interpersonal Skills
CHAPTER 3         Health History
CHAPTER 4         Physical Examination
CHAPTER 5         Clinical Reasoning, Assessment, and Plan
CHAPTER 6         Health Maintenance and Screening
CHAPTER 7         Evaluating Clinical Evidence
UNIT 2  Regional Examinations
CHAPTER 8         General Survey, Vital Signs, and Pain
CHAPTER 9         Cognition, Behavior, and Mental Status
CHAPTER 10       Skin, Hair, and Nails
CHAPTER 11       Head and Neck
CHAPTER 12       Eyes
CHAPTER 13       Ears and Nose
CHAPTER 14       Throat and Oral Cavity
CHAPTER 15       Thorax and Lungs
CHAPTER 16       Cardiovascular System
CHAPTER 17       Peripheral Vascular System
CHAPTER 18       Breasts and Axillae
CHAPTER 19       Abdomen
CHAPTER 20       Male Genitalia
CHAPTER 21       Female Genitalia
CHAPTER 22       Anus, Rectum, and Prostate
CHAPTER 23       Musculoskeletal System
CHAPTER 24       Nervous System
UNIT 3  Special Populations
CHAPTER 25       Children: Infancy through Adolescence
CHAPTER 26       Pregnant Woman
CHAPTER 27       Older Adult

Bates’ Guide To Physical Examination and History Taking 13th Edition Bickley Test Bank

CHAPTER 1 Approach to the Clinical Encounter
After completing an initial assessment of a patient, the nurse has charted that his
respirations are eupneic and his pulse is 58 beats per minute. These types of data
would be:
a Objective.
b Reflective.
c Subjective.
d Introspective.
ANS: A
Objective data are what the health professional observes by inspecting, percussing,
palpating, and auscultating during the physical examination. Subjective data is what
the person says about him or herself during history taking. The terms reflective and
introspective are not used to describe data.
DIF: Cognitive Level: Understanding (Comprehension) REF: p. 2
MSC: Client Needs: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Management of Care
• A patient tells the nurse that he is very nervous, is nauseated, and feels hot.
These types of data would be:
a Objective.
b Reflective.
c Subjective.
d Introspective.
ANS: C
Subjective data are what the person says about him or herself during history taking.
Objective data are what the health professional observes by inspecting, percussing,
palpating, and auscultating during the physical examination. The terms reflective and
introspective are not used
to describe data.DIF: Cognitive Level: Understanding (Comprehension) REF: p. 2
MSC: Client Needs: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Management of Care
• The patients record, laboratory studies, objective data, and subjective data
combine to form the:
a Data base.
b Admitting data.
c Financial statement.
d Discharge summary.
ANS: A
Together with the patients record and laboratory studies, the objective and subjective
data form the data base. The other items are not part of the patients record, laboratory
studies, or data.
DIF: Cognitive Level: Remembering (Knowledge) REF: p. 2
MSC: Client Needs: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Management of Care
• When listening to a patients breath sounds, the nurse is unsure of a sound that is
heard. The nurses next action should be to:
a Immediately notify the patients physician.
b Document the sound exactly as it was heard.
c Validate the data by asking a coworker to
listen to the breath sounds.
d Assess again in 20 minutes to note whether
the sound is still present.
ANS: C
When unsure of a sound heard while listening to a patients breath sounds, the nurse
validates the data to ensure accuracy. If the nurse has less experience in an area, then he
or she asks an expert to listen.
DIF: Cognitive Level: Analyzing (Analysis) REF: p. 2
MSC: Client Needs: Safe and Effective Care Environment: Management of Care
• The nurse is conducting a class for new graduate nurses. During the teaching
session, the nurse should keep in mind that novice nurses, without a

background of skills and experience from which to draw, are more likely to
make their decisions using:
a Intuition.
b A set of rules.
c Articles in journals.
d Advice from supervisors.
ANS: B
Novice nurses operate from a set of defined, structured rules. The expert practitioner
uses intuitive links.
DIF: Cognitive Level: Understanding (Comprehension)
REF: p. 3 MSC: Client Needs: General
• Expert nurses learn to attend to a pattern of assessment data and act without
consciously labeling it. These responses are referred to as:
a Intuition.
b The nursing process.
c Clinical knowledge.
d Diagnostic reasoning.
ANS: A
Intuition is characterized by pattern recognitionexpert nurses learn to attend to a pattern of
assessment data and act without consciously labeling it. The other options are not correct.
DIF: Cognitive Level: Understanding (Comprehension)
REF: p. 4 MSC: Client Needs: General
• The nurse is reviewing information about evidence-based practice (EBP). Which
statement best reflects EBP?
a EBP relies on tradition for support of best
practices.
b EBP is simply the use of best practice
techniques for the treatment of patients.
c
.
EBP emphasizes the use of best evidence
with the clinicians experience.
d
.
The patients own preferences are not
important with EBP.

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Write a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Product has been added to your cart